One has to teach themselves to remember that which they forgot. Each and every one of us was there at Har Sinai. The Torah was given to us by Hashem through Moshe Rabbenu. How can we have forgotten that which was the greatest moment of our lives? Yes it has been quite a long time and our souls had to undergo many trails and tribulations through many incarnations; yet, still we must seek to remember the greatest moments of our lives. Not just this precious time period alone but others as well.

 

If we seek such knowledge with the conviction and will power of one who had lost a check worth thousands of dollars, would we not begin to recall just a little of this memory? One would brush away sleep from their eyelids only to remember where that check might have been dropped and forgotten. When we read events in the Torah, especially happenings in which tell us, ‘you were there’; do we truly believe this to be so? If we did, we would force ourselves to recall even one moment of these great happenings. Purposely, would wouldn’t choose to recall the tragic events like those in which Pharaoh sought us bodily harm, yet even so, on the holiday of Pesach, our sage’s advice us that we should feel as if we too are going out of Egypt this very moment. Generally when a person thinks back many years ago or even that very day, they choose to remember that which brings them gladness and not sorrow. It seems as if Hashem is playing a similar role as a counselor here, trying to bring out the past in order for us to appreciate how that event influenced our lives for the better.

 

One might ask; If Hashem really wanted us to remember so much, why did he make it so easy to forget such important dealings? For instance, the medresh informs us that right before a child leaves the womb of its mother, an angel comes and taps it on its lip so that the baby forgets all the Torah it learned during the previous nine months(from a special angel) in the holy womb of its mother. This would seem almost contradictory to the very fact that Hashem sent the angel in the first place to help the child to gain wisdom and understanding to assist it in dwelling in our world.

 

When you look into the face of a little child, you notice a pureness and cleanness which is heavenly. Sometimes a parent looks at their child and wonders for but a moment, could it be he/she really knows the truth about me? All my secrets, everything that is really happening; does he/she know? Then returning back to their senses, the parent realizes that it couldn’t be so. The child doesn’t have the understanding to internalize the complicated things around surrounding it. Their thoughts are, the pureness is simply an exterior or simple one since the complications of this world haven’t entered their mind yet. This may be so but since most of us are far from such purity of this little child, how can we truly know what it divines and understands? In its simple understanding, the child knows the difference between many aspects of pure and un-pure. How can it not as it not far from its original pureness in the womb having been in this world a short time?

 

This manuscript seeks to uncover the mysteries of the mind and creation. Exploring many aspects of how the mind scientifically tries to unravel the past, present and future. We cannot and will not attempt to understand the greatness of creation as it is impossible for us as mere mortals to do so. Purposely though, Hashem has left us some fragments in the hopes we would seek true understanding in this matter. After-all, why are we told to remember events but at the same time we were influenced to forget them?  Have we really erased them from memory or is this simply an illusion created from the impurities of the world that are attached to us? How far does Hashem desire us to go when He tells us, ‘zachor, remember’? Is it possible for us to remember the events of the womb, previous incarnations, the giving of the Torah, the going out of Egypt, the spitting of the red sea and other tribulations?

 

It seems as if there is a mixed message being given here as too what we are to accomplish and what knowledge we are too acquire. Is the purpose of this ordeal simply a balance between, emunah, trust in Hashem and to ‘zachor’? If so, let it be clarified and understood in such a way that we can better ourselves and draw close to Hashem through both these methods, instead of going through our entire lives not grasping both.

 

The purpose of this sefer is enable one to attain purity of mind and emunah to such an extent that the Torah once again shines forth its realness. A person will have to toss away the confusions of the world and mind. They will have to have the will power and desire to know their truth self and pureness of their neshamah. To seek out such a hidden treasure must be done in all privacy and secrecy. It requires the casting away of some normalcy and an open mind towards the unknown.

 

Long ago, the Aleut Indians called Alaska "Alakshak" - The Great Land. "It's doubtful that anyone who has ever seen the state's colossal glaciers or its teeming wildlife would disagree with that description," says Seattle-based John Smith, one of the world's foremost nature photographers. In the past two decades, Smith has made nearly 50 trips to Alaska.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 



CHAPTER 1.

 

 

SEEKING TO REMEMBER



CHAPTER 2.

 

 

MAKING TORAH STUDY SPIRITUAL

  CHAPTER 3.

 

 

 

SEGULOS FOR MEMORY AND LEARNING


  CHAPTER 4. NESHIKA, THE KISS OF THE TZADDIK


 

CHAPTER 5.

 

ATTAINMENT THROUGH TEARS


 

Future Chapters:

CHAPTER 6. HOW THE MIND AND SOUL MEET

 

 

CHAPTER 7. THE THINGS WE HAVE FORGOTTEN

AND WHY

  

CHAPTER 8. IMAGINATION OR REAL

 

 

CHAPTER 9. REMEMBERING AS IF WE WERE THERE